Heritage Sites

Canadian National Railway Station (The Pas) (The Pas)

Manitoba Star Attraction

The VIA Rail / Canadian National Railways Station at The Pas is a one-and-a-half-storey, multi colored brick railway station, built in 1928.  It is centrally located in the Town of The Pas.  The Station reflects the optimistic outlook of the late 1920s fo rthe future of northern Manitoba and The Pas.  It functioned as a terminus and distribution centre for northern Manitoba and was important to the mining and forestry industry. 

Phone:
204-623-2210


Cape Merry National Historic Site of Canada (Churchill)

Manitoba Star Attraction, National Heritage Site

Once called Knight's Round Point (for James Knight who, in 1717, began construction of a fur trading post for the Hudson's Bay Company), the cape was later renamed for Captain John Merry, Deputy Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company from 1712-18. The remnants of a gun powder magazine can still be seen at the site. In 1959-60, a single battery was rebuilt using stone blocks found at the site. Its lone cannon, one of the orginal 42 from Prince of Wales Fort, stands today. Among the Cape's distinctions is that it was the site of the first Lutheran service delivered in western Canada. The service was performed by a Rev. Rasmus Jensen, a minister with the crew of Jens Munck, a European trying to find the Northwest Passage. A stone cairn at the cape commemorates the crew and Fort Churchill.

Location:
Located on the east shore of the Churchill River, across from Prince of Wales Fort.

Hours:
Guided tours available. Contact the Parks Canada office.

Phone:
204-675-8863

Fax:
204-675-2026


Historic Norway House (Norway House)

The Archway Warehouse survives as a tangible reminder of the furtrade era
Norway House was the crossroads of the northern transport network of the Hudson’s Bay Company during the 19th century and is one of the original Hudson's Bay Trading Posts. Three structures – The Archway Warehouse (1826), Jail (erected in 1855-56 and is the oldest extend lockup in the province) and Powder Magazine survive as tangible reminders of the furtrade era.

Admission:
FREE

Phone:
204-359-6719

Email:


Sloop Cove National Historic Site of Canada (Churchill)

National Heritage Site

A sloop was a wooden sailing vessel used during the fur trade. Sloop Cove was a sheltered, safe harbour for Hudson's Bay Company sloops during the 18th century. Rocks at the cove bear the signatures of HBC men including Samuel Hearne who was just 22 years old when he carved his name here. Hearne was employed by the HBC and was governor of Prince of Wales Fort from 1775 until 1782 when the Fort was destroyed by the French. He later established Fort Churchill.

Tours to the cove can be arranged with private tour operators, as access can only be gained by boat or helicopter. 

Location:
Located 4 kms (2.5 miles) upriver from Prince of Wales Fort National Historic Site of Canada.

Admission:
Fee charged for guided tour.

Phone:
204-675-8863

Fax:
204-675-2026

Website:

Email:


Tramway Park (Grand Rapids)

On the shore of Lake Winnipeg, a section of a tramway built in 1877 by the Hudson's Bay Company has been relaid.  Western Canada's first railway, the tramway, allowed goods to be carried around the rapid from Lake Winnipeg to Saskatchewan River.


York Factory National Historic Site of Canada (Churchill)

Located near the mouth of the Hayes River approximately 250 km (155 miles) south of Churchill, this 102-hectacre site's most prominent feature is the Hudson's Bay Company's Depot building. For over two centuries, beginning in 1684, York Factory was a major administrative, transshipment and manufacturing centre and provided the HBC with access to quality furs, both from the hinterlands and from Aboriginal traders.

The current site is known as York Factory III and was developed after 1788. York Factory I (1684-1715) and York Factory II (1715-1788) were located about 1 km (0.6 mile) downstream from the current location.

The site was abandoned by the HBC in 1957 and ownership was transferred to the Government of Canada in 1968. It is now a National Historic Site.

Location:
Located 250 km (155 miles) southeast of Churchill on the Hayes River.

Hours:
Open approximately June 1 to mid-September (weather permitting).

Admission:
No entry fee. Fee charged for interpretive programs and tours.

Phone:
204-675-8863

Fax:
204-675-2026